Viki interviews CPA and author, Mike Campbell – When Mom and Dad Need Help, A Step-by-Step Guide to Senior Housing and Care

July 11, 2012 by  
Filed under Kind Ethics Radio


Senior care expert and author Mike Campbell has been an advisor to the senior housing and care industry for over 20 years. Now he wants to share with you what he’s learned from his 2+ decades in the industry. He’s written an award-winning book called

    When Mom and Dad Need Help

which educates the reader about all the long-term care options available in the market and arms them with a step-by-step plan to find the quality option that is the best fit for their loved ones.

July 25th at 2PM PDT, 5PM EDT
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/kindethics/2012/07/25/mike-campbell-cpa–making-senior-housing-decisions-wisely

Are you worried about what you’ll do when Mom or Dad can no longer care for themselves?

“As adult children, it is so important that we educate ourselves about the process BEFORE THE CRISIS OCCURS! It’s not such a scary subject if we know what to expect!”
- Mike Campbell, Author/Senior Care Expert

When Mom and Dad Need Help is a GREAT RESOURCE that educates the reader about all the different long-term care options available in the market and provides them with an easy-to-follow step-by-step plan to find the quality care option that is the best fit for their loved ones.

“Anyone and everyone close to an older family member should read this book.” -Diane Gardner, ForeWord Reviews

    When Mom and Dad Need Help

is the:

Winner of the 2011 Independent Publishers Book of the Year Award in the Aging category
Winner of the 2010 ForeWord Reviews Book of the Year Award in the Family and Relationships category

“This is a much needed book that is well written for the consumer. The telephone surveys, as well as the tour and interview checklists are excellent guidelines and tools.”
- Sister Roseann E. Kasayka Ph.D., MT-BC, DA

Is your parents’ well-being worth less than a $10 investment? If so, download the book right now! Outlined below are the direct links where you can buy this award-winning book in either the eBook or Print format.

eBook Kindle version at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/When-Mom-Need-Help-ebook/dp/B007BDLWSS/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&qid=1274817836&sr=8-1

eBook Nook version at Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/when-mom-and-dad-need-help-michael-c-campbell/1100199574?ean=2940013941847

eBook version at Kobo (readable on all desktops, all tablets (including IPad), and all smartphones (including IPhone): http://www.kobobooks.com/ebook/When-Mom-Dad-Need-Help/book-TjavAs0ed0mhegpP3bdrig/page1.html

Print version at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/When-Mom-Dad-Need-Help/dp/0974298409/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274817836&sr=8-1

Print version at Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/when-mom-and-dad-need-help-michael-c-campbell/1100199574?ean=9780974298405&itm=1&USRI=when+mom+and+dad+need+help

You can also order a print version of the book toll-free at 1-800-345-6665.

DOWNLOAD FREE CHECKLISTS to conduct telephone surveys, tours and interviews of all the various senior housing and care options. http://www.iffenwen.com/checklists.html

Have a kind and respectful day.

Choosing a Nursing Home – A checklist

October 5, 2009 by  
Filed under For Patients & Families


Visit Nursing Home Compare at www.medicare.gov/NHCompare for more information. This list can be found at http://www.medicare.gov/LongTermCare/Static/StepsOverview.asp

Name of Nursing Home:
Date of Visit:

Basic Information – Answer Yes or No

The nursing home is Medicare-certified.
The nursing home is Medicaid-certified.
The nursing home has the level of care you need (e.g. skilled, custodial), and a bed is available.
The nursing home has special services if needed in a separate unit (e.g. dementia, ventilator, or
rehabilitation), and a bed is available.
The nursing home is located close enough for friends and family to visit.

Resident Appearance

Residents are clean, appropriately dressed for the season or time of day, and well-groomed.

Nursing Home Living Spaces

The nursing home is free from overwhelming unpleasant odors.
The nursing home appears clean and well-kept.
The temperature in the nursing home is comfortable for residents.
The nursing home has good lighting.
Noise levels in the dining room and other common areas are comfortable.
Smoking isn’t allowed or may be restricted to certain areas of the nursing home.
Furnishings are sturdy, yet comfortable and attractive.

Staff

The relationship between the staff and the residents appears to be warm, polite,
and respectful.
All staff wear name tags.
Staff knock on the door before entering a resident’s room and refer to residents by name.
The nursing home offers a training and continuing education program for all staff.
The nursing home does background checks on all staff.
The guide on your tour knows the residents by name and is recognized by them.
There are licensed nursing staff 24 hours a day, including a Registered Nurse (RN) present at
least 8 hours per day, 7 days a week.
The same team of nurses and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) work with the same resident
4 to 5 days per week.
CNAs work with a reasonable number of residents.
CNAs are involved in care planning meetings.
There is a full-time social worker on staff.
There is a licensed doctor on staff who is there daily and can be reached at all times.
The nursing home’s management team (including the Director of Nursing and the
Administrator) has worked together for at least 1 year.

Residents’ Rooms

Residents may have personal belongings and/or furniture in their rooms.
Each resident has storage space (closet and drawers) in his or her room.
Each resident has a window in his or her bedroom.
Residents have access to a personal telephone and television.
Residents have a choice of roommates.
Water pitchers can be reached by residents.
There are policies and procedures to protect residents’ possessions.
Hallway, Stairs, Lounges, and Bathrooms and Exits are clearly marked.
There are quiet areas where residents can visit with friends and family.
The nursing home has smoke detectors and sprinklers.
All common areas, resident rooms, and doorways are designed for wheelchair use.
There are handrails in the hallways and grab bars in the bathrooms.

Menus and Food

Residents have a choice of food items at each meal. (Ask if your favorite foods are served.)
Nutritious snacks are available upon request.
Staff help residents eat and drink at mealtimes if help is needed.

Activities

Residents, including those who are unable to leave their rooms, may choose to take part in a
variety of activities.
The nursing home has outdoor areas for resident use and staff help residents go outside.
The nursing home has an active volunteer program.

Safety and Care

The nursing home has an emergency evacuation plan and holds regular fire drills (bed-bound
residents included).
Residents get preventive care, like a yearly flu shot, to help keep them healthy.
Residents may still see their personal doctors.
The nursing home has an arrangement with a nearby hospital for emergencies.
Care plan meetings are held with residents and family members at times that are convenient
whenever possible.
The nursing home has corrected all deficiencies (failure to meet one or more Federal or state
requirements) on its last state inspection report.

This is just the beginning. Make sure you plan on visiting at different times of the day and night to make sure that this is the place you would want your loved one to live. And after the person moves in, make sure you keep visiting at random times so the staff knows you are watching out for your loved one.

Have a kind and respectful day.

“Protecting the Nursing Home Resident – The job of the ombudsman” Interview with Molly Davies, August 18th, at 10AM pacific.

August 10, 2009 by  
Filed under Kind Ethics Radio


“Protecting the Nursing Home Resident – The Job of the Ombudsman” Interview with Molly Davies, August 18th, at 10AM pacific. Call in to listen live at (347) 945-5152 or listen online at blogtalkradio.com/kindethics.

After serving more than two years as a regional manager for the Long-Term Care (LTC) Ombudsman Program, two years as an Ombudsman care manager, and two years as a volunteer Ombudsman, Ms. Davies was named Program Director of the LTC Ombudsman Program in October 2006. She manages the Los Angeles County and City LTC Ombudsman programs and serves as the designated LTC Ombudsman “program coordinator” per state contract requirement.

In her capacity as program director, Ms. Davies oversees all aspects of the WISE LTC Ombudsman Program, including program development, implementing LTC policy changes, monitoring budgets and promoting the program to the public. She and her staff ensure that service delivery complies with all regulatory and contract guidelines and the policies and procedures that govern the program. She is responsible for monitoring and reporting on program performance monthly, maintaining a tracking system for reports of alleged elder abuse and assessing client satisfaction. She is also responsible for recruiting, training and evaluating ombudsmen. Ms. Davies holds a bachelor’s degree in Sociology from UCLA and is currently completing a master’s degree in Social Work at California State University Long Beach.

Have a kind and respectful day.

“Changing your Nursing Home Culture and Environment.” Part 2 of Interview with Frances Shani Parker, author of “Becoming Dead Right: A Hospice Volunteer in Urban Nursing Homes” on July 31st, 12pm PST.

July 16, 2009 by  
Filed under Kind Ethics Radio


Changing your Nursing Home Culture and Environment.” Part 2 of Interview with Frances Shani Parker, author of “Becoming Dead Right: A Hospice Volunteer in Urban Nursing Homes” on July 31st, 12pm PST.

Call in to listen live at (347) 945-5152 or listen online at blogtalkradio.com/kindethics. To listen to Part 1: http://tinyurl.com/rdsf58

An award-winning writer, consultant, and former school principal, Frances shares insights and experiences about her years of hospice volunteering in Detroit nursing homes. Using stories, poems, and general information, she has written a groundbreaking book that is an inclusive and literal guide for becoming dead the right way. Topics include hospice, caregiving, dementia, death, bereavement, and strategies for improving eldercare and nursing homes. While universal perspectives are presented, the often missing views of people of color and residents in urban nursing homes are examined.

Frances’ background as an educator and her upbringing in New Orleans, LA add interesting layers to her problem solving in nursing homes and to her descriptive storytelling. She uses her writing and public speaking skills to advocate for senior citizens and promote conversations empowering others to have dignified death journeys. Her favorite anonymous quote is “If you think one person can’t make a difference, you haven’t been to bed with a mosquito.” Visit Frances in cyberspace at www.francesshaniparker.com and at her blog titled “Hospice and Nursing Homes http://hospiceandnursinghomes.blogspot.com

Video Poem: Reflections of a Hospice Volunteer (Hospice, Nursing Homes, Eldercare) 3:25 mins.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeBl5QtlPxg

Video Poem: “Pieces of Our Minds” (Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, Hospice, Nursing Homes) 2:24 mins.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgRoKDUEOUk

(Search under FrancesShaniParker on youtube.com.)

Have a kind and respectful day.

Ombudsman Program cut dramatically in California. With these cuts, you need to be more proactive about protecting your loved ones in nursing homes.

June 18, 2009 by  
Filed under For Patients & Families


I don’t know if you know about a service that is provided free of charge to our nursing home residents. It is something called an ombudsman. (I have used the services of the Ventura County Ombudsman program when my aunt was in a nursing home.) The ombudsman is a specially trained person who protects the resident from being forced to sign something they don’t understand, protects them from elder abuse and protects them when they are receiving sub-standard care. I will be interviewing Molly Davies from the Los Angeles County Ombudsman Program, The WISE & Healthy Aging Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program, in August but I just wanted to let people in the Los Angeles area know about the effects of the budget cuts today. The office is down to 10 people who are protecting the 73,000 nursing home residents in Los Angeles County nursing homes. If you have a loved one in a nursing home in California, you need to be even more diligent about visiting and checking on your loved ones for the rest of this year. Hopefully, next years budget will better but for now, we all have to take on the role of the protector for our loved ones. Here is the statement from the Los Angeles County office.

Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program
Impact of the Governor’s Budget Reduction

The impact of the enacted 49% State budget cut to the local Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program (LTCOP) in California is devastating to the integrity of the services that are delivered and will negatively impact the residents that we serve. The WISE & Healthy Aging Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program is the sole contractor of Ombudsman Services in the City and the County of Los Angeles. The impact to this local program has been the loss of $1,109,783 in funding retroactive to July 1, 2008. In response we have eliminated 22 positions resulting in the reduction of staff from 32 to 10, and we have closed our Lancaster, Downtown LA, Burbank, and San Dimas regional offices. All remaining staff received a reduction in salary.

The following are conservative projected estimates of the reduction of our capability to deliver service to residents in long-term care.

Over 12,000 unannounced visits to nursing homes and board and care or assisted living facilities will not be conducted during this fiscal year, and every year thereafter.

Over 11,500 cases, including allegations of abuse and neglect will not be investigated during this fiscal year, and every year thereafter.

The LTCOP in California has three currently unfunded mandates that include the investigation of elder and dependant adult abuse investigations that occur in long-term care settings; the witnessing of advance health care directives for residents in skilled nursing facilities; and responding to the 24-hour State Ombudsman after-hours crisis line. Although these are unfunded mandates, we have managed to take on these tasks with out further compensation from the State of California, but may not be able to sustain these activities without restoration of our funding.

In the last fiscal year the WISE & Healthy Aging Ombudsman Program responded to 2,086 abuse complaints. Many elder abuse cases are identified during unannounced visits conducted by Ombudsmen, which will decrease proportionally with these enacted budget cuts.

The WISE & Healthy Aging Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program is the largest in the nation providing service to more than 1,816 facilities that have the capacity to care for 73,486 residents. The Ombudsman Program advocates for the rights of residents in long-term care facilities, and for many residents we are the only outside support they receive. The impact of these cuts effectively silences the voices of our most vulnerable constituents, residents in long-term care.

You may want to support the pending legislation AB 394 (Feuer and Jones) Protecting Vulnerable Seniors from Abuse and Neglect by Restoring Ombudsman Funding
AB 392 would use penalties paid by substandard nursing homes to help restore monitoring and advocacy by ombudsman programs. It is fitting that the penalty funds be used to support the ombudsman programs given their critical role in protecting residents’ health and safety.
Current law allows the penalty funds to be appropriated for ombudsman services. AB 392 would require that at least half of the penalty funds be allocated to local ombudsman programs each year in accordance with an existing formula.
Support AB 392 is co-sponsored by CANHR and the following organizations: AARP, Bet Tzedek Legal Services, California Alliance for Retired Americans, California Association of Area Agencies on Aging, California Senior Legislature, California Commission on Aging, Catholic Charities of California, Congress of California Seniors, and Ombudsman & HICAP Services of Northern California. Additionally, it is supported by local ombudsman programs and many other consumer organizations.

You may want to write or call your state senators.

Want More Information?
Use www.leginfo.ca.gov to find contact information for your Senator • and Assembly Member
and to keep track of AB 392’s progress.
• Visit CANHR’s website (www.canhr.org) for updates on all of CANHR’s legislation and to find
out how to become a CANHR Advocate.
• Call CANHR @ (800) 474-1116.

Have a kind and respectful day.

Say Thank You To A Nurse Today. May 6th – 12th is National Nurse Week.

May 11, 2009 by  
Filed under Ethics In Action


May 6th – 12th is National Nurse Week

I want to say thank you, thank you, thank you to all of the nurses. Whether you are a hospital nurse, a home health nurse, an office nurse, a nursing home nurse, a surgical nurse, a hospice nurse or some other type of nurse, thanks for everything you do. And thanks for putting up with the doctors. And thanks for putting up with the patients and their families. We all don’t make it easy for you. But you still show up and take care of us.
I truly appreciate you and hope you will keep being a nurse. We need you. I encourage every one to do something nice for a nurse today. Maybe send a thank you note to the nurse that works at your doctor’s office or drop off a healthy treat. If your loved one is in a care facility, do something nice for the nurses there. Maybe offer to volunteer one day a month and help with meals at the skilled nursing facility. Anything you can do will help. We already have a shortage of nurses so if we want the future to be safe for us, be nice to a nurse today and remember to thank them all year long.

On Monday, May 11th at 2PM PST, blogtalkradio.com/kindethics, I will be interviewing Frances Shani Parker, author of “Becoming Dead Right: A Hospice Volunteer in Urban Nursing Homes”

May 7, 2009 by  
Filed under Kind Ethics Radio


On Monday, May 11th at 2PM PST, blogtalkradio.com/kindethics, I will be interviewing Frances Shani Parker, author of “Becoming Dead Right: A Hospice Volunteer in Urban Nursing Homes”

She is an award-winning writer, consultant, and former school principal, Frances shares insights and experiences about her years of hospice volunteering in Detroit nursing homes. Using stories, poems, and general information, she has written a groundbreaking book that is an inclusive and literal guide for becoming dead the right way. Topics include hospice, caregiving, dementia, death, bereavement, and strategies for improving eldercare and nursing homes. While universal perspectives are presented, the often missing views of people of color and residents in urban nursing homes are examined.

Frances’ background as an educator and her upbringing in New Orleans, LA add interesting layers to her problem solving in nursing homes and to her descriptive storytelling. She uses her writing and public speaking skills to advocate for senior citizens and promote conversations empowering others to have dignified death journeys. Her favorite anonymous quote is “If you think one person can’t make a difference, you haven’t been to bed with a mosquito.” Visit Frances in cyberspace at www.francesshaniparker.com and at her blog titled “Hospice and Nursing Homes Blog.”

She welcomes your questions and calls. You can call in to listen or to ask questions at (347) 945-5152.

Have a kind and respectful day.